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Job Search Trends For 2020

It's human nature to speculate and look ahead.

Who's going to win the Super Bowl? Who will be elected U.S. President in 2020, and what year will someone perfect the flying car that we were promised in Back to the Future? These are all questions that we don't know the answer to, but it's sure fun to have a discussion about and debate.

The same should be said about job search and career trends. With the job market being so competitive, it's important to keep track of the major job and hiring trends.


Glassdoor.com recently published a report about trends for 2020. Many of these trends are worth further discussion, so let's dive in!

Smartphones Will Play A Larger Role In The Job Search Process

Many people are using smartphones to search for and apply to jobs.

Well, since we already do everything else on our phones, we might as well search for and apply to jobs on them too.

Heck, you're probably reading this article on a mobile device (and if you are THANK YOU, we love people that read our articles).

Using smartphones and mobile devices to search for jobs is nothing new, but applying for those jobs on these devices is something that has become more common in recent years.

The downside to this, as Glassdoor reports, is the fact that not every employer's system is mobile-friendly, which results in them missing out on talent because some job seekers will give up on their applications out of frustration.

The good news is, many employers are expected to invest in making their sites more mobile-friendly in the coming years. In the meantime, use caution if you're using a mobile device to apply for a job or stick to a computer.

Companies May Be More Willing To Hire Baby Boomers

At Work It Daily, we often address the issue of experience discrimination, an issue where baby boomers struggle to get employment opportunities because millennials have enough relevant experience to be just as valuable, but at less of a cost.

While this is a tough challenge to overcome, there is hope. Because the pool of baby boomer employees has grown so significantly, employers are starting to change their views on the 65 and up demographic.

Older workers bring with them a wealth of institutional knowledge and professional contacts and it's believed that having a mixture of all ages in the workforce is good for diversifying the workplace culture, as all generations can learn from each other, according to Glassdoor.com.

Those in the 65+ demographic are also showing more willingness to upskill and learn new technologies, which is good because even if companies are more willing to hire baby boomers, they still face an uphill battle.

Artificial Intelligence Will Get A Seat In Upper Management

More companies may make room for artificial intelligence in their management structures in 2020.

The robots are taking over!

Okay, maybe things are not that dramatic, but is has long been known that some jobs could be in danger of automation.

There now may be room for artificial intelligence in management.

While no one is declaring that management positions are in danger of being taken over by robots, there is more opportunity for AI to be incorporated into management, according to Glassdoor.com

There are already AI algorithms in place that could take over some routine, administrative tasks from management, such as planning, communications, budgeting, payroll, and performance reports, to name a few. If more of these administrative tasks are assigned to robots, companies could then redefine the roles of their human management structure.

In many of these cases, it may not be about replacing a person, but rather making better use of their time.

Workplace automation is certainly a trend worth watching in 2020 and beyond, because there's still a lot unknown about what its ultimate impact will be.

Employers Will Prepare For A Potential Recession

Potential recession!

You may be tired of hearing about it by now. You may even consider it to be like "The Boy Who Cried Wolf." But, we ensure you, the concern is real.

Economists have recently highlighted various historical economic indicators pointing towards a possible recession in the immediate future.

Employers are going to prepare for a potential recession by looking into how they may have to adjust their hiring and recruiting practices, according to Glassdoor.com

If employers are preparing for a potential recession, you need to be too!

For the employee, a recession means mass layoffs, fewer jobs, more competition for jobs and less job security.

It's important to watch the news, keep track of the economy, and closely monitor the health of your industry and company.

This may not be the most comfortable topic to think about, but there are things you can do to prepare your career for a recession.

According to Glassdoor.com, other trends to watch for in 2020 include:

  • Employers continuing to prioritize diversity and inclusion
  • Employers putting a greater emphasis on company culture
  • The 2020 presidential election will unleash companies' political side (what's the worst that could happen?)

It's fun to speculate about 2020 and beyond, but while there are many uncertainties about the year ahead, one thing is for certain: Work It Daily will be there tracking the trends.

Join Work It Daily today to stay on top of all the important job search and career news, while having access to one-on-one career coaching and numerous career tutorials.

The SeatGeek employee roster includes a classically-trained opera singer, a retired contender on the competitive eating circuit, and an all-American fencer, to name a few. Having such a unique and diverse workforce under one roof is something that SeatGeek takes pride in. Not only does it create a fun company culture, but it lends itself to endless ideas and perspectives

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