What Is Your Online Reputation Doing To Your Job Search?

Many job seekers mistakenly believe that, because they aren’t on Facebook, or Twitter, their online reputation is spotless. Related: Unfortunately, this isn’t always the case.


Why Is Your Online Reputation Important Anyway?

Reppler, a social media monitoring service designed to help users manage their online image across different social networks, conducted a survey of 300 hiring professionals - 91% of these hiring professionals responded stating that they thoroughly scrutinize an applicant’s online reputation during the hiring process. Here’s what they found…
  • Facebook is the most frequently screened social network with LinkedIn coming in second.
  • The majority of hiring managers review social profiles before the interview.
  • The primary reason a candidate is rejected is because they lied about their qualifications this can become apparent while cross-checking their background.
  • The reason given for candidates hired is because they left a positive impression of their personality and organizational fit.

What is your online reputation doing to your job search?

As an Executive Resume Writer and Career Strategist, I work with clients everyday who would benefit from professional assistance with online reputation management. Take for example a senior corporate executive who is also the pastor of his church. He is a highly respected member of his community with a name that most would assume is not particularly common. Unfortunately, after googling him, we found a Twitter account belonging to a young man by the same name on the first page of Google. This young man regularly sends out tweets of an offensive nature that would make any hiring manager cringe. Is this unfair? Absolutely! However, you can’t blame the employer either. After all, who would want their brand tainted by an employee who lacks the judgment necessary to know that posting questionable content is both foolish and immature? So, what can you do to reverse the damage or mitigate your risk? Replace the content with professional profiles you want employers to see. First, I recommend you register your legal name as your domain name if at all possible. For example, mine would be www.angiejones.com. As long as your job search is public knowledge, I recommend posting your resume on your new website. If cost is a concern, you can do this yourself at 1and1.com I also recommend that you create a blog in your name where you regularly create content demonstrating your knowledge of the industry. It is important that you create profiles on a variety of social networks including Facebook, LinkedIn, Youtube, and so on. Google ranks websites due to popularity, so make sure your friends and family members visit your newly created profiles. Given enough attention, you are likely to be successful in pushing down undesirable content to the second or third page. Keep in mind that a stellar online reputation does require regular maintenance so that questionable content does not reappear. If you are in need of profile development; visit our website at www.ANewResume.com. In addition, there are companies that specialize in online reputation management which include www.reputation.com.

Related Posts

10 Ways To Build Your Brand Reputation Online Tips For Making Your Online Image Employer-Ready   Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the interview situation one of our viewers, Remi submitted. He was in an interview and was asked the question: How many cows are there in Canada right now? - What a weird question but this is a technique that some hiring managers are using these days.

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Kevin submitted. He is a college student who's working a part time job to make ends meet. The manager/owner of the company has become a micro-manager who watches him work on camera and reads his company emails. A bit over the top wouldn't you say?

SHOW MORE Show less

All work and no play can create a tense and unwelcoming environment. Studies have shown that employers that offer additional perks have employees that are happier and more loyal to their place of employment. If you are looking for an employer that acknowledges how important it is to give its employees a place to de-stress and bond with their co-workers, check out these companies!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if you worked for an owner who micro-manages you my watching you work on camera and reading through your company emails.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less