How can you project confidence when you don't feel it? One of the most interesting things I learned from my days as an actor was seeing how audiences tended to remember what a person did much more than how they did it.


In other words, if you take the correct actions, despite not being confident, you'll trigger the same response as though you were. The goal? Establishing yourself as the job candidate who can deliver the most value. Someone who is in demand, understands his/her worth, and is willing to advocate for it.

Here are some hacks to help you appear confident in your next job interview:

1. Have A Great Answer For Tricky Questions You Know Will Come Up

Man responds to an interview question

If you were laid off or fired, you know it's going to come up during the hiring process. So, make sure you have a good answer that eases any potential concerns from the employer.

We recommend using the Experience + Learn = Grow framework when you outline your responses for these types of questions. What happened? What did you learn from the experience? How did you grow into a better employee as a result?

Having good answers ready for tough interview questions can set you apart from the competition.

2. Be Flexible With Your Time When It Comes To Interviews

Job candidate interviews for an open position

When an interview runs over, it's a great sign. They want to continue learning about you, so let them! If you cut it short, you risk losing a great opportunity to sell yourself.

Make sure you block out enough time during the day for your interview, to get there and in case the interview goes long. You don't want to leave a job interview early, especially if it's going well! That will rub the hiring manager the wrong way, and definitely hurt your chances of moving on in the interview process.

3. Make Sure You Have A Number Or Range Ready When They Ask About Salary Requirements

Hiring manager asks about salary requirements during a job interview

No one likes getting the brush off when it comes to important details. If an employer has a budget for a role, they need to know whether it's worth their time to continue with you (and vice versa!).

Also, this is a good opportunity for you to demonstrate that you've researched this and have a clear understanding of your value. An accurate and reasonable salary range will make you seem more confident, and can make it easier to negotiate salary down the road.

4. Always Ask For Next Steps So You Know What To Expect And How You Should Respond

Woman asks about next steps at the end of her job interv

Some companies have longer interviews than others, and not every hiring process is the same. Making sure you know what to expect is key so you can set yourself up for success.

It's simple: never leave an interview without asking the hiring manager what the next steps are! You'll walk out feeling confident about what to expect in the coming weeks. Also, don't forget to send a thank you note!

5. "I'm Interested In This Job, And Want It!"

Job seeker tells hiring manager they want the job

Sounds obvious, right? But you'd be amazed how many great candidates lose out on the offer by being dinged for a lack of enthusiasm for the role.

The best solution? As the interview's wrapping up, take a second to bring it up.

Why are you excited about the role? Why are you excited about being a part of what they're doing? And yes, stating outright that you'd like the job. It can make a big difference.

Download Work It Daily\u2019s free list of common interview questions

It's okay if you're struggling with feeling confident during your job search. These five hacks can help you appear confident and stand out from the competition. Sometimes it's best to fake it until you make it!


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This post was originally published at an earlier date.