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As a professional, building a successful career has never been more difficult. Not only are there fewer jobs available for a more skilled workforce, but competition for any given job is through the roof. A recent study conducted by CareerBuilder.com found that, in addition to the 8% unemployment rate, 77% of people who already have jobs are also looking for their next gig. Related: Why Starting A Blog Could Help Your Job Search Job seekers have to stay sharp if they want to have a chance in this hypercompetitive market. They have to make sure their skills are up-to-date and their resumes are polished, but self-promotion is becoming increasingly important to getting noticed. For an increasing number of professionals, a personal website is the answer. According to research by Workfolio, 56% of people surveyed felt that websites were the best self-promotion tool currently available. Here are some additional reasons why you should start building a personal website:


1. A Website Improves Your Chances Of Being Found

A website will make you more visible in search engine results. People searching for you by name as well as people looking for your skills will be more likely to find you.

2. Most First Impressions Now Happen Online

According to Google, 80% of people research others online before meeting them for the first time. That number jumps to 95% when talking about employers researching candidates. A beautifully-designed and well-written website gives you the best chance of making that crucial first impression a great one.

3. A Website Gives Your Content More Attention

Research has shown that people spend more time on websites than they do on a given social networking profile. Without distractions like ads, third-party branding, and other users’ profiles competing for visitors’ attention, you can take your time to explain yourself and what you are looking for and have the message stick.

4. A Website Sends A Strong Professional Message

For years, prominent authors, musicians, politicians, and other personalities have used websites to raise their profiles and provide a place to showcase their careers. Having your own website sends a message that you care about your professional image, and good, relevant content shows you put time and thought into your job.

5. A Website Lets Your Personality Shine

Good salespeople know how important it is to make personal connections with their clients. Whether it’s a shared hobby, life philosophy, or experience, making some sort of connection with your audience reminds them that you are a real person. Websites give you a chance to talk about your interests and experiences in a way that is difficult to do on a resume, and gives visitors a number of chances to make those important connections.

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Join us for the special presentation on to learn about The Science of Personal Websites for Career Advancement. Presenter: Charles Pooley, Founder & CEO of Workfolio, Forbes Best Website for Your Career Award Winner. Cost: FREE!   WATCH NOW ►     Photo Credit: Shutterstock
Learn how to land a career you love


Everyone needs to feel their voice is heard and their contributions are important. Something as simple as sharing a drink the last hour of the day on a Friday with the team to recap wins and give praise can build camaraderie within the team.


All of the above are fairly simple to implement but can make a huge difference in morale and motivation. Have any of these tips worked well for young the past? Do you have other tips to motivate your creative team? If so, please share them with me!

Encourage curiosity. Spark debate. Stimulate creativity and your team will be better at handling challenges with flexibility and resourcefulness. Create a safe space for ideas, all ideas, to be heard. In ideation, we need the weird and off-the-wall ideas to spur us on to push through to the great ideas.

Sure, there are a ton of studies done on this, but here is my very unscientific personal take. When team members can make decisions about how they work on projects, they are more engaged and connected to the project outcome. When they see how potentially dropping the ball would affect the entire team, they step up. When they feel like what they are doing is impactful and valued, they are naturally motivated to learn more, and be even better team members.

Rarely does a one-size-fits-all style work when it comes to team motivation. I have found that aligning employee goals with organization goals works well. Taking time to get to know everyone on your team is invaluable. What parts of their job do they love? What do they not enjoy? What skills do they want to learn? Even going so far as to where they see themselves in five years career-wise. These questions help you right-fit projects, and help your team see you are committed to creating a career path for them within the company.

Most designers I know love a good challenge. We are problem solvers by nature. Consistently give yourself and your team small challenges, both design-related and not. It will promote openness within the team to collaborate, and it will help generate ideas faster in the long run. Whether the challenge is to find a more exciting way to present an idea to stakeholders or fitting a new tool into the budget, make it a challenge just to shake things up.

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