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This is it. It's the light at the end of the tunnel. After going through the hiring process, you're offered a position! Congratulations! It's a big accomplishment and you should be proud of yourself. However, just because you got the offer doesn't necessarily mean you should accept it on the spot.


Think about it. Would you buy a house without considering what it means for you in the long run? Your career shouldn't be any different. Taking a job is a huge investment for both you and your potential employer, so some serious thought needs to go into your decision.

Before you accept that job offer, ask yourself these five questions.

Is This The Role I Want To Pursue?

This question may seem like an obvious one to ask, but it's still important. There could be a huge difference between how you view the job and how your employer views it. Take another look at the job description to make sure it is, in fact, what you want. Also, think back to how the hiring manager described the position during your job interviews. Did you like their answer when you asked them what a typical day in the job looks like?

Don't forget to consider what you're good at, and what you actually want to do for work. Are there skills you'd really like to use on a daily basis? If so, make sure they're a necessary part of the position. Are there skills you DON'T like using on a daily basis? If so, see if they're required for the job, and if they are, find out how often you'd need to pull them into your work.

It's important to know what your role will be and what will be required of you daily. This is also a good time to ask your potential employer to clarify anything for you.

Am I Going To Be Happy At This Job?

Happy professionals at work

Your happiness level at your job will impact your work. In MetLife's 17th Annual Employee Benefit Trends Study, 90% of workers surveyed said their loyalty is directly tied to their happiness.

When debating whether to take the job or not, consider the environment you'd be working in as much as the work itself. Is this a place you can see yourself going to every day? Do you share the company's core values? Do you like the company's culture? Your happiness is key for productivity, and it's important to evaluate if this job will help you thrive.

Can I Meet My Employer's Expectations?

Woman gets a job offer and takes it

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You got a job offer for a reason. The hiring manager thinks you'd be a good fit for the company after looking over your resume and going through a series of interviews. They believe you can do the job, but do you believe you can?

Be honest with yourself. This is a big step for both you and your potential employer, so you want to be confident in your skills. Taking another look at the expectations of the job is never a bad thing, especially if you haven't accepted the position yet. That way, you can gauge your skills and determine if you can meet—or even exceed—your potential employer's expectations.

Remember, you don't want to take a job that will be too demanding and require too much from you (resulting in poor work-life balance), but you also don't want to take a job that will be too easy for you, either. The right position for you will have a manageable workload and lots of opportunities to grow as a professional. Take the job that won't bore you, but also won't burn you out in six months.

How Do I Feel About My Future Boss and Co-Workers?

Professionals in a meeting at work

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Think back to your in-person interview when you met your potential boss and co-workers. What were your first impressions of them? Did you think your potential boss was someone you could work for happily? Were your potential co-workers friendly and eager to get to know you?

If you take the job, you'll be spending a lot of time with these people. It's important to be honest about how you feel about them.

Will This Job Help Me Grow In My Career?

Man decides to accept a job offer

Think about your short-term and long-term career goals, then take another look at the job description. Is this job going to help you reach those goals? What will you learn in this position that will take you to the next level?

The position should help you grow as a professional. If you aren't sure about opportunities for advancement, this time allows you to reach out to the hiring manager and ask (if you haven't already asked about this during the interview process).


Before you take a job, remember to ask yourself these five big questions. That way, you'll accept every job offer confidently, excited about the next chapter in your career.


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This post was originally published at an earlier date.

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