4 Things Interviewers Rate You On

Clearly, you want to demonstrate you have the experiences and skills for the job, but what is it that makes one candidate more favorable than the other when they both equally have the same type of experience and skills? Understand what other areas interviewers consider when reviewing each candidate as a total package so you perform your best at the interview. Related: 5 Tips To Ace The In-Person Interview Here are four areas interviewers rate you on:


1. Enthusiasm

Employers want a job candidate with a “can-do” attitude and who has a strong desire to work for the company. Make sure that comes through in your communication, from your cover letter, phone interview, in-person interview to the thank you note. Even if you are interviewing with other companies, you want to make it known that you remain highly interested in the position. When you are meeting in person, you can also use your body language to help demonstrate engagement and interest. For more tips on body language at the interview, read “What Your Interview Body Language Reveals About You.”

2. Communication Skills

The #1 trait that employers seek for every position is strong communication skills. Your ability to articulate what experiences and skills you have to offer and how it can contribute to your future employer has to come through if you want to impress the interviewer. People hire people they like so your job in the interview is to transition it into a conversation so be prepared to ask questions during the process. Keep in mind that a key part of communicating effectively has to do with intonation and body language. When your voice exhibits excitement and you’re leaning forward and making eye contact, that is stressing to the interviewer you’re communicating something of importance. The words you use will account for only 10% of effective communication.

3. Technical Skills

The first thing an employer will do is determine if you have the requisite skills and experience for the position. Make sure you have studied the job posting, researched people on LinkedIn and know what they are looking for and how you can contribute. Showcase the things you have done that make you a good candidate by using the Challenge-Action-Result storytelling technique.

4. Overall Fitness For The Position

You need to demonstrate that you are a “good fit” for their organization. This is measured in two ways: your skill and competencies and your demeanor and personality. Once you have shown that your technical skills are there, they want to see if people will want to work with you. Don’t be afraid to let some of your personality come out. The interviewer wants to see your sense of humor, confidence level, and whether you come across as honest or fake. The right combination of all those qualities will inform the interviewer if you’re the right fit for the job, but also its culture. For more tips on coming off relatable, read “3 Ways To Build Rapport And Ace The Interview.” So, while you prepare for your interview to demonstrate you have what it takes to do the job, don’t forget to impress the interviewer on these other factors that will differentiate you from the other job candidates who may have similar experiences and skills. This post was originally published at an earlier date Photo Credit: Shutterstock

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