3 Steps To An Outstanding Personal Branding Statement

Your resume is an amazingly important document. It not only speaks to your past accomplishments, but it also acts as a predictor of your future capabilities. Related: The Perfect Recipe For A Great Personal Brand However, your resume can’t successfully complete this task if it isn't packed with quality information. This includes an outstanding personal branding statement. What is a personal branding statement? It is a statement that communicates who you are in the workplace. Borrowed from the marketing world, it reflects your professional reputation. On your resume, the statement is used to summarize, in just a few words, who you are. This is why it’s so important to take formulaic steps in order to develop one that gets the job done.


Personal Branding Statement Example And Formula

To get started, take a look at a branding statement that delivers the goods: COMMUNITY AFFAIRS MANAGER with 10 years of experience visualizing, developing, and organizing company wide philanthropic events, maintaining connections with hundreds of nonprofit organizations, coordinating diverse employee volunteer opportunities, and creating dynamic external and internal event communications. Why is it successful? It gives a snapshot of your history in the field while providing branding attributes that describe what makes you successful. Also, it gives examples of previous accomplishments that offer insight into how you can help an employer succeed. So which formula could you use to create your own?

1. Consider Your Outlook On The World

It may seem a bit far-reaching to say that your overall outlook on life can create a great personal statement, but in actuality, it is your outlook that has guided you to your profession and has helped you develop your talents. So take time to write down your vision. Do you want people to communicate better with one another? Do you hope to expand the breadth of our already-expansive technology? Think about what it is that can help you create the broad umbrella encompassing all of the specific goals your branding statement will incorporate.

2. Think About Your Individual Goals

Again, a branding statement is all about showing an employer that you have goals—and that you not only intend to achieve them in the future but already have in the past. So, what are your career goals? How do you want to make a difference? Write down what you’d like to achieve—along with those skills you possess that can help you attain your goals.

3. Look At Your Attributes And Professional History

Finally, it’s important to recognize your brand attributes, then apply them to your professional history. To identify your attributes, come up with at least three nouns to describe yourself as a professional. Are you a great communicator, leader, visionary, or organizer? Then drum up three sentences that round out your professional history in relation to those attributes (e.g. I have 15 years of experience leading groups through philanthropic efforts). After completing these goals, you’ll have enough information to create a truly outstanding branding statement that not only gives an employer confidence in your ability to succeed but boosts your own confidence as a top professional. This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Related Posts

Boring Old Resume Objective Vs. Branding Statement How To Craft The Opening Statement Of Your Resume Creating A Personal Branding Statement For An IT Resume

About the author

Jessica Holbrook Hernandez, CEO of Great Resumes Fast is an expert resume writer, career and personal branding strategist, author, and presenter. Want to work with the best resume writer? If you would like us to personally work on your resume, cover letter, or LinkedIn profile—and dramatically improve their response rates—then check out our professional and executive resume writing services at GreatResumesFast.com or contact us for more information if you have any questions. Disclosure: This post is sponsored by a CAREEREALISM-approved expert. You can learn more about expert posts here. Photo Credit: Shutterstock

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Diane submitted. She has recently worked with a co-worker on a group project. When it came time to present the project at a meeting, Diane let her co-worker present. While it went great, the co-worker proceed to take credit for nearly all of Diane's work. Frustrating to say the least!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if your co-worker took credit for the work you did...right in front of your colleagues AND boss!

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

If you saw our first video, you might have heard about the awkward situation one of our viewers, Cam submitted. He's been working at a job for awhile, but recently overheard a hiring manager making fun of a candidate with autism right after an interview-not only awkward, but VERY unprofessional!

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if witnessed a hiring manager at your organization making fun of a candidate who they had just interviewed who had autism.

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less

Starting a family is one of the biggest milestones in a person's life. It's in those first few months when a parent can really bond with their newborn and make lifelong memories. However, for some new dads, it can be difficult to juggle being a new parent while remaining dedicated to their career.

Fortunately, some companies have generous paternity leave policies that give new dads the ability to take time off of work to stay home with their child.

SHOW MORE Show less

There are LOTS of questions around resume dos and don'ts. There's so much advice out there that it can be overwhelming to try and figure out what's the correct answer.

During our weekly live Office Hours on YouTube, two of our coaches, Ariella Coombs and J.T. O'Donnell, answer questions live from viewers related to their job search, career success, on the job situations and more.

We complied a simple list of what we find to be the most common questions our coaches get about resumes. We hope you find this helpful.

Let's start with the basics...

SHOW MORE Show less

Back in March, we made the hard decision to change our private Facebook group of over 37 THOUSAND members to a fee-based only platform.

SHOW MORE Show less

In this week's episode of "Well This Happened", we want to know what you would do if a recruiter called you a day EARLY for your phone interview (and you were NOT PREPARED!)

We want YOU to be the career coach and tell us which one is the RIGHT answer!

Think you know? Vote below, and stay tuned for later this week when we announce the right answer (and why the other ones are wrong).

SHOW MORE Show less