Blog

3 Tips For Sending Your Cover Letter To Employers

Woman sends her cover letter to employers

Not sure of the right way to send your cover letter to employers? There are some critical things you should keep in mind.


You already understand how important it is to write a disruptive cover letter for each position. But, how do you send your cover letter to employers without making a mistake?

Here are three tips for successfully sending your cover letter to employers:

1. PDF It

Man saves his cover letter as a PDF

Bigstock

Always send your cover letter as a PDF so your formatting doesn't get screwed up, unless you're instructed differently by the employer. Why? Because your attachments can be sent to multiple people within the company and you don't want your amazing cover letter to get lost at the bottom of an email chain.

So, let's make things easy. Saving and sending your cover letter as a PDF should be the default. There will be less confusion on their end and you can be sure that your cover letter is being viewed in the correct format and won't take away from the appeal of your entire job application.

2. Proofread!

Woman proofreads her cover letter before sending it to employers

Bigstock

Proofread like six times. If you think you've proofread it enough, do it once more. This is one of your first impressions. Make it a good one! Don't let typos or grammatical errors hurt your brand.

It also doesn't hurt to have another set of eyes review your cover letter before you send it out. Ask a trusted friend or colleague to proofread your cover letter and give any feedback they may have on format, sentence structure, or clarity. Does the story you tell in your cover letter covey everything you want to say effectively, without spelling and grammatical errors?

3. Leave Out The Email Address Until The Last Minute

Man emails his cover letter to an employer

Bigstock

Don't put the email address in until you're 100% sure your message is perfect. You don't want to accidentally send in your job application without attaching your cover letter or reviewing its contents on more time.

Bonus tip: Your email message should be your cover letter, unless the employer specifically says to attach your cover letter to the email.

Download Work It Daily\u2019s free cover letter samples

Writing and sending cover letters to employers can be tricky. Follow these three tips to ensure your cover letter makes a great first impression.


Looking for more job search help?

Check out our FREE resources page.

Or, join our career growth club today and get access to one-on-one career coaching, resume and cover letter reviews, online tutorials, and unlimited networking opportunities—all in your back pocket!

If you want FREE career advice in your inbox, subscribe to our newsletter The Daily Dose!


This post was originally published at an earlier date.

Get Some Leverage
Sign up for The Work It Daily Newsletter
Follow
Man thinks about becoming self-employed
Bigstock

Look, I'm just going to say it. Not everybody should work for themselves. Right now, there's this huge craze about working independently, being self-employed, being your own boss. So much of this came out of the pandemic because people realized they wanted to have control over their careers and not be at the mercy of their employers' needs. But if you're looking to take control of your career, becoming self-employed is not always the best solution.

Still, there are many benefits to being self-employed. Let's take a look at those benefits before I dive into how you can take control of your career without having to quit your job and take on self-employment.

Read moreShow less
Executive sits down with her employees during a team meeting
Image from Bigstock

Every hiring manager looks for different skills in the job candidates they're hoping to hire. Not only are job candidates being evaluated on the hard skills they possess; they're also being evaluated on their soft skills—the skills that don't belong on a resume but can be identified during a job interview. It's these soft skills that separate the good employees from the great ones. Executives, managers, and other leaders within an organization keep this in mind when interviewing job candidates and reviewing the performance of current employees.

Read moreShow less
Featured