3 Weaknesses ALL Career Changers Must Address When Looking For A New Job

When looking for a new job, career changers have it tougher than most job seekers. In fact, there are three major weaknesses all career changers have to overcome when looking for a new opportunity. But what are they?


1. You don't know what you already have to offer.

Transferable skills are hard skill sets that transfer to different roles and industries. For example, public speaking, project management, and customer service are all transferable skills. "So often, career changers haven't done the homework on themselves," said career expert J.T. O'Donnell. So, look at your skills and strengths, and ask yourself how you can provide value to another industry. What do you have to offer? "You have to connect those dots," said O'Donnell. "Employers won't do that for you."

2. You don't have a clear idea of where you want to go.

In order to move into a new field or job, you have to have a game plan ready. You need to have a clear strategy of where you want to go, what you want to do, and how you're going to do it before you make the leap.

3. You don't have a strong network.

Networking is such an important piece of finding a job - most people don't realize how effective a strong network can be during a job search. If you're changing careers, it's even MORE important. "Your network is your net worth," said O'Donnell, "and [its] going to help you make that lane change." If you want to make a smooth career change, you need to signal your network so it knows you're looking for something different. You need to focus on developing relationships and nurturing your current connections. They're going to be the ones to let you know when an opportunity arises. So, be aware of these things when looking for a new job, and take steps to overcome them. Otherwise, they will hold you back from finding a job you truly enjoy.

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